A Beginner’s Guide to the Ziller Valley Dialect

The Ziller Valley is not only famous for its music but also its dialect.
Zillertal Dialect

©TVB Mayrhofen

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Many of our visitors, especially those from Germany, find the local slang both amusing and charming. However, only very few are able to actually understand it, which makes it even more fascinating. Even I sometimes struggle to understand certain words and don’t use all of them myself. That’s why I decided to make a list of some expressions that you might hear during your stay in the Ziller Valley. See how many you can understand and try them out on the locals! Read aloud for maximum fun!

Zillertaler Dialekt
©Elisabeth Frontull
Zillertaler Dialekt
©Elisabeth Frontull
Zillertaler Dialekt
©Ursula Aichner

The most important from A-Z

aufgeig’n – to play the violin

außaklaum – to take out

auss(a)rgab – change (money)

aussn balantang – to throw out

Boarischa – dance, style of music

botschad – clumsy

Botsch’n – shoes; flat tyre

bschtell’n – to order

Degl – pot, pan

derrisch – deaf, hard of hearing

diacht’n – to be thirsty

Diare – door

Dirndl – girl

Drenza – baby’s bib

drettl’n – running on the spot

Drial – (lower) lips

drupfezn – to drip

Ducht – thirsty

Dutnkraxn – bra

eggschtrig – especially; separately 

faesln – light snow

feacht – last year

fesch – pretty

Ficht’nmöped – chain saw

Fidel – violin

Fratz’n – cheeky child

friaga – in the past

Foarmass – breakfast

Füchtach – apron

Goasara – handmade shoes with nailed soles

Grias di/enk – Hi!

g’schnochtz – in the evening

g’scheftlach – on business

gschnalle – bad situation, a cumbersome task

G’sellin – girlfriend, partner

gwarig – alert

Ha? – pardon?

hale – slippery

Hegl – friends

Hentling – glove

Hiele – bed cover

Hontach – towel

Huagacht – conversation, get together 

hundacht – hundred

innen – inside

Janka – jacket

kaf’n – to buy

Keachbam – cherry tree

Kearfass’/Kearschauf’l – dustpan

Kelle – ladle

Klamme – gorge, canyon

klaub’n – pick, gather

Klötte hengen – very drunk

Knafl – head

kreutang – to scuff/ trash something

koscht’n – try, taste something

Kumm’r – room, bedroom

Labe – toilets

Loppe – someone lacking intellegence

Leff’l – spoon

leze beinand(a) – I’m not feeling well

Lot’a – boyfriend, partner

Loite – people

Mame – mum 

Manda – men

Mankal – marmot

melch’n – to milk

modang – to make hay

na – no

nachtig – tired, bleary eyed

nindacht – nowhere

nochtal – evening meal

nochtrocht’n – to think about something

Oachkatz’l – squirrel

ochnkügl’n – to fall down

Pfoat – shirt

Rach – smole

ranggl’n – to wrestle

Ranz’n – wide belt

rauschig  - to be drunk

Reme – hut for storing hay

Ruache – ill-mannered person

sauff’n – to drink

Scheibtruache – wheelbarrow

Scheißhäusl – toilet

Scheißschicht – change of shift

Sektnschlegl – grumpy person

spineisln – to spy on

Sure – slurry

treschtang – to dance, to stamp your feet in time to the music 

Wiacht – landlord, innkeeper

woll woll – yes, definitely

zeabagscht – the highest point

Zoig – things

Zuaspeis(’n) – side dish

Zunta Staud’n – Alpine roses

Zwoabettkummr – double room

aufgeig’n – to play the violin

außaklaum – to take out

auss(a)rgab – change (money)

aussn balantang – to throw out

Boarischa – dance, style of music

botschad – clumsy

Botsch’n – shoes; flat tyre

bschtell’n – to order

Degl – pot, pan

derrisch – deaf, hard of hearing

diacht’n – to be thirsty

Diare – door

Dirndl – girl

Drenza – baby’s bib

drettl’n – running on the spot

Drial – (lower) lips

drupfezn – to drip

Ducht – thirsty

Dutnkraxn – bra

eggschtrig – especially; separately 

faesln – light snow

feacht – last year

fesch – pretty

Ficht’nmöped – chain saw

Fidel – violin

Fratz’n – cheeky child

friaga – in the past

Foarmass – breakfast

Füchtach – apron

Goasara – handmade shoes with nailed soles

Grias di/enk – Hi!

g’schnochtz – in the evening

g’scheftlach – on business

gschnalle – bad situation, a cumbersome task

G’sellin – girlfriend, partner

gwarig – alert

Ha? – pardon?

hale – slippery

Hegl – friends

Hentling – glove

Hiele – bed cover

Hontach – towel

Huagacht – conversation, get together 

hundacht – hundred

innen – inside

Janka – jacket

kaf’n – to buy

Keachbam – cherry tree

Kearfass’/Kearschauf’l – dustpan

Kelle – ladle

Klamme – gorge, canyon

klaub’n – pick, gather

Klötte hengen – very drunk

Knafl – head

kreutang – to scuff/ trash something

koscht’n – try, taste something

Kumm’r – room, bedroom

Labe – toilets

Loppe – someone lacking intellegence

Leff’l – spoon

leze beinand(a) – I’m not feeling well

Lot’a – boyfriend, partner

Loite – people

Mame – mum 

Manda – men

Mankal – marmot

melch’n – to milk

modang – to make hay

na – no

nachtig – tired, bleary eyed

nindacht – nowhere

nochtal – evening meal

nochtrocht’n – to think about something

Oachkatz’l – squirrel

ochnkügl’n – to fall down

Pfoat – shirt

Rach – smole

ranggl’n – to wrestle

Ranz’n – wide belt

rauschig  - to be drunk

Reme – hut for storing hay

Ruache – ill-mannered person

sauff’n – to drink

Scheibtruache – wheelbarrow

Scheißhäusl – toilet

Scheißschicht – change of shift

Sektnschlegl – grumpy person

spineisln – to spy on

Sure – slurry

treschtang – to dance, to stamp your feet in time to the music 

Wiacht – landlord, innkeeper

woll woll – yes, definitely

zeabagscht – the highest point

Zoig – things

Zuaspeis(’n) – side dish

Zunta Staud’n – Alpine roses

Zwoabettkummr – double room

[Translate to en:] ©Norbert Freudenthaler

My top 3 sentences in Zillertal dialect

Nacht’n g‘schnochtz bin i mit an Kiabl voll Sautall a da Hoachndille iban Drischhibl gstoflt.

Yesterday, I tripped over the attic step while I was carrying the organic waste bin.  

 

Mit die Doggl’n is auf’n Sölda hale.

The floor is slippery, if you’re wearing slippers  

 

Zeabagscht oben an Fok’nstoll isch a Weggslnescht.

There’s a wasp nest right at the top of the pig’s pen. 

More Ziller Valley Dialect

I hope you’ve learned something, I certainly have! If you’d like to learn more, these expressions and many more can be found online at www.zillertaler-woerterbuch.com. Have fun improving your ‘Zillertalerisch’ and maybe a few phrases will come in handy during your next visit to the Ziller Valley.  

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